Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) by Werner Herzog - Unsung FilmsWerner Herzog’s latest documentary is just as enjoyable and just as hilarious as the German master’s best; strangely reminiscent of earlier works like Little Dieter Needs to Fly – the way Herzog moves around his subjects, manipulates the angles, stages every moment and every movement — but much bigger. The size of Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World is difficult to sufficiently describe. It’s a combination of Herzog’s evolving style and the film’s personalities that creates a kind of awe-inducing spectacle whereby geniuses of science and technology such as Lawrence Krauss and Kevin Mitnick burst out of the screen with big features, odd angles, never quite right, never quite expected. These people are filmed in carefully placed position and with lighting that seems to have been decided upon after hours of shifting, editing, and experimenting.

Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) by Werner Herzog - Unsung FilmsThe speakers feel as though they are speaking from behind some invisible barrier, caught in between worlds, a barrier separating reality from the director’s vision of a connected world, and reaching out to us from another dimension. These people, mostly those behind what Herzog calls “the biggest and most significant revolution in history”, victims of that same revolution (internet addicts) and hackers, aided by meticulous editing, spin a story together that sheds light on the growth of the internet from its beginnings until now; the doors it opened; the dangers it’s caused; the people it hurt; the future that lies in wait.

Read at Unsung Films: Encounters at the End of the World.

Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) by Werner Herzog - Unsung FilmsAs expected of HerzogLo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World is speckled with brief sparks of insanity (analogies that include a dishwasher and a fridge falling in love) and the usual outrageous and ridiculous questions posed, combined with a profound amount of digging and unearthing what lies behind one of the greatest and most impacting inventions in history and the deal behind the people involved. The timing of Herzog’s interviewing and camerawork testifies to his genius: the moments of inappropriate lingering, the uncertainty in comments that would have been left out by any other filmmaker.

Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) by Werner Herzog - Unsung FilmsBut it is exactly these moments that contribute towards Herzog’s apparent intention, that it, to allow his viewers to see things in a different way, and the focus on the peculiar sides of issues and subjects that are mostly left unobserved and undiscussed. In Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World, viewers, and particularly fans of Herzog, have the opportunity to observe the unfolding of a story told by somebody with a special talent for looking beyond the ordinary, stepping outside his own life and steeping his audience in a world that he truly believes exists.

Watch the trailer for Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World here:






External links

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World at IMDb
Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World at Wikipedia
Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World (awards won and nominated for) at IMDb