Mortdecai: The Soundtrack - Unsung FilmsBrilliant cast, impressive soundtrack, bad reviews. With these three facts I can begin my introduction of the new David Koepp film; a film by a director who is more known for his achievements in scriptwriting and less known for his directorial skills. Mortdecai is based on Kyril Bonfiglio’s series of 70s novels of the same name.

Lord Charlie Mortdecai is a charming but unreliable art dealer, mixed up with angry Russians, the British MI5, even with an internationally renowned terrorist- and his only form of defense is the image he works so hard to maintain. In the midst of a kind of ongoing crisis, he also attempts to recover a stolen table rumored to contain the code a Nazi bank account which contains gold that had been accumulated during the war.

Geoff Zanelli & Mark Ronson – Open your balls

This is another offbeat comic role, which of course didn’t leave out Johnny Depp, and has surrounded him with several other big Hollywood names like Gwyneth Paltrow, Ewan McGregor, Jeff Goldblum, Paul Bettany, Olivia Munn, and Paul Whitehouse. Alongside the cast you will also discover the participation of two noteworthy musicians; Composer Geoff Zanelli and the British composer, producer, DJ, and singer, Mark Ronson. The first has received two nominations at the Emmys (won in 2008 for the soundtrack to the mini-series Into the West), while the second has collected an array of awards, including 3 Grammys and a Brit – their collaboration on Mortdecai reflects the success of these artists and a soundtrack you’d expect from a combination so diverse and different.

Geoff Zanelli & Mark Ronson – Spinoza

Our two artists present a total of 18 new compositions throughout the soundtrack of Mortdecai. If you considered Henry Mancini’s soundtrack for the “Pink Panther” and all John Barry’s musical endeavors for the James Bond films as masterpieces, then you should definitely check out the album. Vintage style, enhanced with a healthy dose of jazz and choral vocals; a hybrid of romance, retro, and espionage that never becomes tiring or tedious. Each composition creates intensely evocative images from the 40s and 50s.

Read at Unsung Films: Transcendence: The Soundtrack.

Geoff Zanelli & Mark Ronson – Honk Kong

Since the soundtrack was released on the same day as Ronson’s long-awaited album, “Uptown Special”, it had to carry with it some more tracks wisely chosen in order not to be overshadowed by the latter’s release. So the soundtrack holds for us some more surprises because it contains a small selection of more commercial songs. Miles Kane impresses with the opening piece of the soundtrack, titled “Johanna” automatically categorizing the album as one of the most affecting and unique collaborations in Mark Ronson’s resume. The second surprise is the participation of Rose Elinor Dougall of The Pipettes band with the song “Heart’s a Liar”.

Geoff Zanelli & Mark Ronson feat.Miles Kane – Johanna

Geoff Zanelli & Mark Ronson feat. Rose Elinor Dougall – Heart’s a liar

These songs are all included on the soundtrack but the film also includes an array of additional material. Spin Doctors with the their enormous success with the 1993 “Two Princes” give their own rocky contribution while the great Tom Jones and Shirley Bassey lend their hits “It’s not unusual” and “Big Spender” (both the original version and a rousing remix) for the soundtrack of the movie trailers.

Spin Doctors – Two Princes

Shirley Bassey – Big Spender

Mortdecai Soundtrack Tracklist

  1. Johanna (feat. Miles Kane) (04:25)
  2. Hong Kong (04:16)
  3. The Farmer’s Daughter (01:55)
  4. The Painted Lady May Be In Play (00:52)
  5. Spinoza (04:39)
  6. Los Angeles (00:54)
  7. Georgina (00:50)
  8. Heart’s a Liar (feat. Rose Elinor) (03:54)
  9. Curiously Interspersed With Eroti (01:27)
  10. Open Your Balls (03:15)
  11. Questionable Attack, Jock (04:41)
  12. The Duke’s Funeral (01:10)
  13. The Heist (02:51)
  14. Con Fuego (02:33)
  15. Well Spun Rumour (03:36)
  16. The Auction (03:21)
  17. Epilogue (01:15)
  18. In the Bathtub (02:24)

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